Homage to the Queen

   

I was eight when I read my first Diana Wynne Jones novel, Charmed Life; more than 15 years later, having read almost all her canon, I consider her one of the most influential and important writers of my life. She created an abundance of extraordinary, wonderful characters, whom I love to this day; she invented a host of magnificent, magical worlds that it was my dearest wish to visit; and always, she moved and inspired me with her beautiful, brilliant stories. Perhaps, however, the most lasting gift that Diana Wynne Jones has given me is that of her language. There are certain adjectives and phrases, now a treasured part of my writing style, which I first discovered in Diana Wynne Jones books, and particular words that I cannot read or write without thinking of her. Her grace, her warmth, her ability to weave together intricate strands of poetry, mythology, compelling humanity, and true magic in engaging, elegant, easy prose, that dances along the page and makes me laugh aloud with the sheer delight of it, is something that has shaped my understanding of the written word. Jones was a woman for whom the world provided a cornucopia of trials and torments—her childhood was nothing short of Dickensian—but in reading her work, what surpasses the imagination, the cleverness, the depth and richness of her storytelling, is the incredible joy that infuses every word of it. If she had given us nothing else, her invention in A Tale of Time City of the glorious, meltingly amazing 42 Century Butter Pies, widely renowned among connoisseurs of imaginary food, would surely have been enough to secure her standing as a literary legend.

When I was ten years old, I read Howl’s Moving Castle; it immediately became one of my favourite books, but I didn’t realise then what a part it would play in my life. In this marvellous novel of fairytale curses and misperceptions, hats and scarecrows and demons, Jones uses a poem by John Donne as a spell; at age ten, I knew nothing of this 17th century icon, but his words enchanted me nonetheless—I set out to find the poem and read more like it. 11 years later, I am still under the spell of Donne’s language, his complexity, the incredibly layered nature of his writing, and the deep joy that shines through it. The same things, in fact, that have for so long inspired, shaped, and moved me in the magical, lyrical, powerful writing of the inimitable Diana Wynne Jones.

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